Andrew Lam Interviews Angie Chau

Andrew Lam and Angie Chau are two ubiquitous names in the Vietnamese literary scene.  Beyond being writers, they share similar histories as well.  Both were born in Vietnam and had to flee to the United States where they both call U.C. Berkeley as alma mater.  Here Andrew not so much as interviews Angie but rather deftly draws out her thoughts.  Listen as they navigate topics like Vietnamese parents, getting published, and…sex!

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To listen, please click here: Andrew Lam Interviews Angie Chau

Angie Chau

Angie Chau spent the first four years of her life in Vietnam before she was swept into the sea along with the wave of people fleeing the country at the end of the War.  She eventually made it to San Francisco where she grew up.   She obtained a Bachelor’s at U.C Berkeley and a Master’s from U.C. Davis, where she was a fiction editor for The Greenbelt Review.  Her debut book Quiet as they Come has garnered her much attention from the literary circle and has received much praise for its candid telling of the Vietnamese-American experience.

Andrew Lam

Andrew Lam was born in Vietnam to a well-known general.  At 11 years old he had to flee the country by boat and ended up on the shores of San Francisco.  He has built a name for himself as journalist (Society of Professional Journalist Outstanding Young Journalist Award  and The World Affairs Council’s Excellence in International Journalism Award) and a writer (Pen American Beyond the Margins Award in 2006).  He is the editor and co-founder of New America Media and was a regular contributor to NPR’s All Things Considered.  He is the author of Perfume Dreams: Reflections on the Vietnamese Diaspora and East Eats West: Writing in Two Hemispheres.

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This entry was posted in Audio, Identity, Interviews, Literature, Most Critical April 2011, United States and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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