Amy Lam

Amy Lam
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Amy Lam is a writer and editor based in Portland, Oregon and Oxford, Mississippi. She is a Kundiman fellow and the John & Renee Grisham fellow at the University of Mississippi where she is an MFA candidate. She is a contributing editor and cohost of Backtalk podcast at Bitch Media, the deputy editor at diaCRITICS, and the former editorial lead at On She Goes exploring the world of women of color and travel. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Tin House, Gay Mag, Indiana Review Pacifica Literary Review, and more. She is a former punk kid, who penned a long-running column in Razorcake, the only non-profit music magazine in the US.

In Between Spaces: On Being Vietnamese German

So, how do you start loving yourself? When the outside world continues to show you and tell you wherever you go, you don’t belong.

Making a Universe: Christine Nguyen & the Nature of Her Art

"One of my goals is to have the viewers to slow down and put themselves in this imaginary world and think about their own natural environment, experience my imaginary one, and appreciate nature more."

Filmmaker Adele Pham & Nailed It Documentary Explore Vietnamese American History

Nailed It is an origin story of the rise of Vietnamese manicurists in what has grown to a multi-million dollar industry. We spoke with filmmaker Adele Pham about the process of making the film, how it's important to record the history of the women and men in an industry that's not often treated with respect, and the balance between making a documentary that "sparks joy" while still sticking to the facts.

Reimagining Futurity: An Online Exhibition of Tuan Andrew Nguyen

It is memory that builds our understanding of the world, and within that larger understanding, it is memory that helps us construct an identity, to build a sense of self.

SXSW Jury Winner- “No Crying at the Dinner Table” Streaming Now

Vietnamese Canadian filmmaker Carol Nguyen's short documentary, "No Crying at the Dinner Table" has received many accolades, including the grand jury award at SXSW. The moving film explores the layers of grief and what has been left unsaid in a family who share a part of themselves to one another at the dinner table.

Dismantling the Old Boys’ Club: Thuc Doan Nguyen & Hollywood

I think Hollywood has and still most of the time employs their friends from “the old boys’ club,” people who look alike and think alike and have similar views about women. This will only change when Hollywood actually values true inclusion, especially when so many studies and articles show doing right by marginalized groups equals a ton more loot at the box office.