Film

Nailed It is an origin story of the rise of Vietnamese manicurists in what has grown to a multi-million dollar industry. We spoke with filmmaker Adele Pham about the process of making the film, how it's important to record the history of the women and men in an industry that's not often treated with respect, and the balance between making a documentary that "sparks joy" while still sticking to the facts.
It is memory that builds our understanding of the world, and within that larger understanding, it is memory that helps us construct an identity, to build a sense of self.
Vietnamese Canadian filmmaker Carol Nguyen's short documentary, "No Crying at the Dinner Table" has received many accolades, including the grand jury award at SXSW. The moving film explores the layers of grief and what has been left unsaid in a family who share a part of themselves to one another at the dinner table.
His films are not just an artistic statement but also his diary, a place where he can tell his struggles in life, through fear and love, from his own feelings and emotions.

More Than My Ethnicity

I grew up wanting to run away from my physical identity and only wanting to be seen through the lenses of my character, my points of view, and my accomplishments. Why should being born to certain kind of people be at the forefront of everything I do?
I think Hollywood has and still most of the time employs their friends from “the old boys’ club,” people who look alike and think alike and have similar views about women. This will only change when Hollywood actually values true inclusion, especially when so many studies and articles show doing right by marginalized groups equals a ton more loot at the box office.