Profiles

"The tears are built-in to our war stories. Humor provides a back door to sadness that allows for a more gentle, and perhaps deeper, absorption of the story. That doesn't mean I in anyway try to lessen the horror in the story."
"I am creating a fiction / non-fiction of events that have occurred in our history. Memory is slippery."
"But So Lucky is not a diagnosis. I think it’s inaccurate (and can potentially lead to harmful racial stereotyping) to say that our families are the cause of our mental health issues. I think it’s something more complex than that, something spanning over generations and seas. I wanted to create a space, not to point fingers, but to talk about all of it."
Through this podcast, I wanted to break “banh mi” with fellow AAPI folks in Chicago and beyond to share their own experiences connecting to their AAPI roots, the work that they are doing to empower their community, their family, and themselves. 
Bao: My parents loved Vietnamese arts and poetry but knew they lived in a culture that doesn’t value that. And yet here they had a son who was going into art in the English language, and they feared for my survival, which is a pressure a lot of people don’t understand.
I was conscious that the readership would be much broader and unfamiliar with the historical and political context against which much of Cabramatta’s gangs emerged, became Australia’s heroin capital and infamously led to Australia’s first political assassination.