Reviews

Fantasy is about what we might have or could have inherited and the specific grief of disinheritance as well as a fear of losing cultural memory and identity. It’s a type of existential horror that Schreiber writes about and, like any horror story, there’s a feeling of dread that what haunts us will continue despite the story’s ending.
"Coconut Children" is a coming-of-age story about a cohort forever uneasy with itself and others. A generation that was taken from Vietnam before it could lay roots, and then transplanted to a land where the soil was rich but alien, never quite nourishing.
For us, more than anything, "The Republic of Vietnam" is a primer and a demand for a more comprehensive, Vietnamese-written works of history.
These chapbooks center the histories women carry with them as well as how they're making space in the world, in the present as well as the future.
"Savage Pageant" is a companion for our concurrent entrapment and escape. We can accompany the tapir into extinction, crushed and crushing both by and within the play, the pageant, the show.
The Gutter Spread Guide to Prayer rejects the narrative of healing after the death of a loved one, of getting over grief. Instead, one learns how to “hold the grief//like an attic of heirlooms” or set it down “like a parent does an infant.”